15 September 2019

World Cultures Curating workshop at the 2019 Museums Association conference, Brighton


Claire Wintle (University of Brighton) and Helen Mears (Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton & Hove) are hosting a workshop at the forthcoming Museums Association conference and would love for MEG members to join us!
 
The session will focus on “New Skills and Opportunities for World Cultures Curating” (Friday 4 Oct; 12:10-13:10, Brighton Centre Auditorium). Speakers include Rebecca Bridgman (Chair, SSN for Islamic Art and Material Culture), Christo Kefalas (World Cultures Curator, National Trust) and Rachael Minott (Curator of Anthropology (Social Practice), Horniman Museum) and facilitators include Megha Rajguru and Hajra Williams (both University of Brighton) and Rachel Heminway Hurst (Royal Pavilion & Museums). Findings from the session will be shared with the Museums Association, Arts Council England and the Museum Ethnographers Group.
 

Job: Curator/Senior Curator Americas or Oceania




Posted: 21/08/2019 11:57
Salary: £29,141 - £37,136 per annum
Location: National Museum Of Scotland, Chambers Street
Level: Collections Care/Conservation
Deadline: 23/09/2019 23:59
Hours: 37.00
Benefits: Membership of Civil Service pension scheme
Job Type: Permanent



Based at the National Museum of Scotland this permanent, full-time post will support the work of the World Cultures Department. Working within the Department’s Oceania, Americas and Africa Section, the post-holder’s duties will include responsibility for collections; acquisitions; exhibitions; research; publications; and answering public enquiries. Building on the major suite of new galleries in the National Museum of Scotland the post-holder will support development of the collection and displays.  Further details can be found on the NMS website.

Job: Curator/Senior Curator, Japan




Posted: 21/08/2019 12:14
Salary: £29,141 - £37,136 per annum
Location: National Museum Of Scotland, Chambers Street
Level: Collections Care/Conservation
Deadline: 19/09/2019 23:59
Hours: 37.00
Benefits: Membership of Civil Service pension scheme
Job Type: Permanent



Based at the National Museum of Scotland this permanent, full-time post will support the work of the World Cultures Department. Working within the Department’s East and Central Asia Section, the post-holder’s duties will include responsibility for collections; acquisitions; exhibitions; research; publications; and answering public enquiries. Building on the major suite of new galleries in the National Museum of Scotland the post-holder will support development of the collection and displays.  Further details can be found on the NMS website.

New exhibition reveals the Pacific craft of barkcloth


GLAHM:E.458/3 - Barkcloth, Fiji, Melanesia, 1700 – 1860.

A new exhibition opening at the University of Glasgow’s Hunterian Museum this August highlights The Hunterian’s world-class collection of barkcloth from the Pacific Ocean.

Barkcloth:Revealing Pacific Craft showcases some of The Hunterian’s outstanding and decorative examples of tapa and reveals the fascinating process of how it is made.

The exhibition features cloths from Fiji, Hawaii and Samoa, some of which are newly restored and on display for the first time. Also on show are items from the voyages of Captain Cook and the world’s earliest example of barkcloth from the small island-nation of Niue, donated to The Hunterian by the Presbyterian missionary Reverend George Turner.

Barkcloth: Revealing Pacific Craft is the result of a major three-year research project, Situating Pacific Barkcloth in Time and Place, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. Based at the University of Glasgow’s Centre for Textile Conservation and Technical Art History, the project connected The Hunterian collection with those of research partners at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and the National Museum of Natural History, part of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

Little was known about The Hunterian tapa collection prior to the project but the research, which combined methods of material science, conservation, anthropology and art history, has clarified the provenance of most of the pieces and has revealed new scientific findings about the production, trading and use of barkcloth.

Visitors will learn about the processes of making and decorating barkcloth and its uses, as well as the different plants used in its production and how they have been identified. They will also discover how the artefacts came into The Hunterian collection and the conservation challenges they posed.

Barkcloth: Revealing Pacific Craft is at the Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow, from 29 August – 29 November 2019. Admission is free.
Barkcloth: Revealing Pacific Craft
29 August – 29 November 2019
Hunterian Museum
Admission free

19 August 2019

Job Opportunity: Research Associate at Glasgow University.

Glasgow University are looking for a Resaerch Associate to make a leading contribution to the AHRC project: ‘A living tradition: Expanding engagement with Pacific barkcloth’, working with Professor Frances Lennard (Principal Investigator) and Professor Maria Economou (Co Investigator). Specifically, the job requires expert knowledge in the area/s of Pacific ethnography or museum engagement. The successful candidate will also be expected to contribute to the formulation and submission of research publications and research proposals as well as help manage and direct this project as opportunities allow.
Salary will be on the University’s Research and Teaching Grade, level 7, £35,210 - £39,610 per annum.
This post has funding for 6 months.

Deadline: 12 September 2019

11 August 2019

South London Gallery - Researcher in Residence.


The SLG is seeking an engaging and energetic Researcher-in-Residence to work closely with the Art Assassins, the SLG’s youth forum, to explore, unpick and make accessible the archive of materials collected by government anthropologist Northcote W Thomas in Nigeria and Sierra Leone from 1909–1915.
Taking the lead from the Art Assassins, you will explore the relevance of this incredible archive for young people today and help them produce work in response to the material for an exhibition in the SLG’s Fire Station annexe. Working with a number of different artists and SOAS (School of Oriental and African Studies), this role will bridge the gap between complex ideas and academic information and a group of young people who are keen to interrogate their own histories.
As well as working alongside the Art Assassins, the Researcher-in-Residence produces a written paper. This will form the basis of an accessible resource exploring the archive and its significance for the Art Assassins, as well as for the SLG’s audiences and the wider community.
The Researcher-in-Residence will be an experienced and critical researcher with a specialist interest in colonial era archives, diasporic experience and the decolonisation of education and history. At the core of this position is a desire to engage a non-academic public with research methodologies and critical thinking.
We are particularly interested in applicants from low-income backgrounds and those from black and ethnic minority communities, who are under-represented in museums and galleries.
The Researcher-in-Residence is supported by the National Lottery Heritage Fund.
This is a freelance role, the deadline is 19th of August and further details can be found on the SLG website.

30 June 2019

Event: Ethnographic Museums and the shapes of radical hope and reconciliation

Ethnographic Museums and the shapes of radical hope and reconciliation
 Saturday July 13, 17.30-19.00, 
Pitt Rivers Museum Lecture Theatre 



This public event brings global leaders in ethnographic museums together to consider how to reinvigorate museums with ethnographic collections, foreground indigenous knowledges and curatorial practices, and rethink assumptions about museums.

Participants include: João Pacheco de Oliveira (Museu Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil); Joe Horse Capture (Minnesota Historical Society, USA); Damion Thomas (National Museum of African American History & Culture, Smithsonian Institution, USA); Wayne Modest (Museum of World Cultures, The Netherlands).

Entry is via the South Door, Robinson Close, South Parks Road, Oxford. Register for this free event at: https://bit.ly/2ZQDBsk

25 June 2019

Event at Derby Museum & Art Gallery, 11am – 3.30pm, Thursday 18th July 2019.

World Cultures Gallery visit and 'Restitution: a view from the Regions' workshop.

Come and join us in Derby to take part in a discussion and hear case studies reflecting on restitution and repatriation in regional museums, co-chaired by Tony Butler, Executive Director, Derby Museums and Helen Mears, Keeper of World Art at Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton & Hove and then after lunch explore and critique the new World Cultures Gallery with Laura Philips, Head of Interpretation and Display.

This event will be in two parts with a short break for lunch in-between.

Tea and coffee will be provided, but attendees are invited to bring lunch with them or buy lunch from the museum café or café nearby.

To book a place please email Events Officer, Rachel Heminway Hurst events@museumethnographersgroup.org.uk


Restitution: A view from the regions
National and university museums have tended to dominate public and sectoral debate regarding museums and their role in the restitution and repatriation of cultural property and yet, as all MEG members know, regional museums hold important and significant 'world cultures' collections (and may, in many cases, have more freedoms in regards to facilitating the return of material from these).

As Arts Council England looks to develop new guidance for the UK museum sector on restitution and repatriation, this meeting provides an initial opportunity for MEG members to firstly explore what the terms restitution and repatriation mean, reflect on their experiences in responding to claims, to consider the particular needs of regional museums in progressing work regarding restitution and repatriation, and to consider what role MEG might take in supporting the sector. 
Image© Derby Museum & Art Gallery.  Display of figures in the World Cultures Gallery. 


9 June 2019

British Museum Vacancy for Project Curator: West Africa Bronze Casting Traditions Project


Role Summary

Project Curator: West African Bronze Casting Traditions Project
Africa, Oceania and the Americas
Full time
Fixed term (23 months in duration)
£29,607 per annum
Application deadline: 12 Noon on Wednesday 3 July 2019
The British Museum is seeking to appoint a Project Curator to work on the West African Bronze Casting Traditions project. This Project Curator role will undertake essential collection documentation and research on the Museum’s collection of West African bronzes.  This project and the position will involve wider research of the breadth of West African bronze casting traditions and laying the foundations for a major new research project.
Key areas of responsibility:
  • To upgrade the documentation of the Museum’s holdings of West African bronzes, with a focus on Nigeria
  • To research the broader context of the collection, including collection histories, related objects in the collection, and the histories of bronze casting traditions in West Africa as revealed by the collection
  • To make the collection, and knowledge about it, publicly accessible via publication, digital media, exhibition display, and broadcast media
  • To liaise with project partners in West Africa and in the UK, along with other international partners
  • To co-ordinate scientific research on the collections, including liaising with colleagues within the Museum.